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Unknown Paper Money
A challenge to me, is it a challenge to you too ?


I have placed below a small piece of paper here. It is, judging by appearance, a piece of Ch'ien P'iao * (paper money) or credit instrument printed by the old-method, and designed in old-style. The figures on the obverse indicating the value of this paper money is ninety eight percentage of one Tiao *. But its date of issuing has no reference. There can be found no serial number, no seal or signature on the both sides of this paper money. I don't know where it came from. This may be an unused private bill issued by some Ch'ien Hao or Ch'ien Chuang (financial institutions or money shops) for circulating on the local market in ancient China. In the Chinese history, the first true paper currency was Chiao-Tzu (means exchange medium) which appeared in Szechwan in the 11th century. Of course, this small piece of paper is not Chiao-Tzu, but what is it? Is it a counterfeit paper money ?

* Ch'ien P'iao [In the early 11th century, Chinese officials and merchants invented paper money as an ideal substitute for the large quantities of coin needed in trade. For example, a long distance payment of 10 Tiao coins weighting about 40 kilos, it was inconvenient to transfer the coins from one place to another. Paper money was a good solution for the payment. Paper money circulating during the different dynasties had different names, such as Ch'iao Tzu, Ch'ien Yin , Hui Tzu and Kuan Tzu in Sung dynasty; but Chiao Ch'ao and Pao Ch'ao were frequently used during the Yuan dynasty. Ta Ming T'ung Hang Pao Ch'ao (Treasured currency of Great Ming) was used as the name of paper money in Ming dynasty. Ta Ch'ing Pao Ch'ao (Treasured currency of Great Qing) was the last name for the old-style paper money in the Qing dynasty. However, various paper currencies and styles were used throughout the dynasties.]

* Tiao [The term for a string of 1000 copper cash. Actually, a smaller number was accepted during transactions, such as 98% of one Tiao, and even less than 50% appeared in certain districts of the northern provinces during the certain period. The case applied to this paper money is called Chiupa-Ch'ien [short strings of 980 cash]. The other names for a string of 1000 cash were Kuan and Ch'uan . Ch'uan and Tiao were prevailed in the Ming and Qing dynasties as well as in the early years of the Chinese Republic. While Kuan was used in Sung and Yuan dynasties.]





Marks of Rareness of the Collected Currencies
Extremely Rare A ~ Very Rare B ~ Rare C ~ Not So Many D ~ Common E



Issue Evolution and Peculiarity
No.: 045 Size: 110mmx178mm Issued by: Tung-Shun-Yung Rareness: ?


Obverse



Reverse






Additional information from Mr.Ed Bohannon of USA
About your inquiry on the unknown paper money. I looked it up in the definitive catalog, "Chinese Banknotes" by Ward D. Smith and Brian Matravers, 1970 and it is not listed. I believe it to be a sample note printed for the purpose of selling printing to banks or stores before the 1900's. I would'nt place too high a value on it, but it is rather unusual.

[Thanks indeed to Mr.Ed Bohannon] YKL



Additional information from Mr.Thomas Chow

In reference to your "unknown paper money - Tung Shun Yung", I found an illustration (no. 432), on the book "Catalogue on the Recent Banknotes and Coupons", written by Mr. Zhang Zhi Zhong (Cheung Chi Chung) - ISBN 7-5015-1534-4 / Z-67
There is no description on the specified note, however there is prefix and serial number printed at the right hand side , and mentioned at the bottom "no payment when lighting on", plus the date: 20th May, 15 th year of Republic of China (1926) at the left side.
Most probably your note is a blank note before circulation, and the above mentioned details will be added by the issuing company by printing with wooden block and the serial number in written.
P. S. : Mau Ping is a county near Yantai, Shandong Province.

[Thanks indeed to Mr.Thomas Chow] YKL

Additional information from Mr.S.SHEVTSOV of Russia

I am a collector from Moscow, Russia, collecting of Chinese coins and paper money for more than 20 years and have about 100 items of Chinese local paper money. I have found one item similar to yours "unknown paper money - Tung Shun Yung" in a new catalogue of Chinese local paper money on page 217. The obverse (value, picture etc) is the same but color is black - dark blue. The money has a serial number printed at the right hand side and mentioned at the bottom "no payment when lighting on", plus the date: 30th May,15 th year of Republic of China (1926) at the left side. There is a picture of a mountain village without people on the reverse. The color of the reverse is dark blue. Size 192 x 108 mm. Rareness: common (1 star).

Another additional information from Mr.S.SHEVTSOV of Russia

I'm a collector of Chinese paper money from Moscow, I have send you a message about Dong Shun Yong local paper money some months ago. Now I have made scan images of 2 local paper money and sending to you for your reference. You can place it on your WEB site if you want.
First image - Dong Shun Yong local paper money, but it differs from your image. It has date [20th June, 15th year of Republic of China or 20th June 1926] of issue, some imprints of seals which mean that it has been in circulation, it has dark blue color of obverse and reverse is different from yours.


Obverse and Reverse



Second image – Zhen Hua Gongsi. It differs from your image too. It has serial number and reverse is different. I think it was not in circulation because it has no any marks or imprints on it.

[Thanks indeed to Mr.S.Shevtsov] YKL


Additional information from Mr.Erwin Beyer

I have been a collector of Chinese paper money for more than 40 years. I read with interest the comments on the 1 Diao note "dong shun yong" (i always use the official pin-yin romanization) from Mouping, Shandong.
I bought the note for my collection 15 years ago. It is pictured and described in my catalog on Chinese banknotes, vol. 13, p.168. I assigned catalog no. B-D130-10 to it.

[Thanks indeed to Mr.Erwin Beyer] YKL





    Bibliography

  1. , 1994, ISBN 7-5000-5469-6.
  2. Pang Hsin Wei : , (The Currency History of China), 1988. ISBN7-208-00196-0/K.47
  3. A History of Chinese Currency (16th Century BC - 20th Century AD), 1983 Jointly Published by Xinhua
    (New China) Publishing House N.C.N. Limited M.A.O. Management Group Ltd. ISBN 962 7094 01 3



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Any additional comment would be much appreciated, you can send it to Y K Leung.









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