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Bone Shells

The Imitations of the Genuine Shell (1400BC~1100BC)

Cowry shells were used as a medium of exchange in ancient China, but when the supply of sea shells did not seem to have met the demand of the economic growth, so as early as the Shang dynasty, genuine shells were supplemented by bone and bronze shells.




Marks of Rareness of the Collected Currencies
Extremely Rare A ~ Very Rare B ~ Rare C ~ Not So Many D ~ Common E


Description
Obverse
Reverse
Mint Evolution & Peculiarity
No. 0031 The bone shells are the imitation cowries made from bone which outwardly resemble real shells, but the mouth wrinkles less, with ten to twenty horizontal or slant strokes filed across the surface. During the recent years, large quantities of the bone shells have been unearthed in the archaeological sites, such as in the modern provinces of Hopeh, Honan, Shantung and Shansi of China. Some of the bone shells were dyed in green or brown. Bone shells with only one hole on the reverse also existed.
Place of
origin:

unknown
Wt. 2.2 g.
height: 23 mm
width: 14 mm
Rareness E








    Bibliography

  1. 中國大百科全書(中國歷史), 中國大百科全書出版社 1994, ISBN 7-5000-5469-6.
  2. Liu Chu Cheng :中國古錢譜 (Illustrative plates of Chinese ancient coins) National Bureau Cultural Heritage 1988. ISBN 7-5010-0298-3
  3. Pang Hsin Wei:中國貨幣史, 上海人民出版社 (The Currency History of China), 1988. ISBN 7-208-00196-0 / K.47
  4. Ting Fu Pao :古錢大辭典, 中華書局 (A dictionary of ancient Chinese coins), 1982. 17018.121


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